Tag Archives: COVID-19

COVID-19 around the world: Map and statistics

Worldometer

BY COLLECTING DATA from official reports, directly from Government’s communication channels, Worldometer is run by an international team of developers, researchers, and volunteers with the goal of making world statistics available in a thought-provoking and time relevant format to a wide audience around the world.

To learn the current statistics of the COVID-19 epidemic around the world, click HERE.


Johns Hopkins University

IN RESPONSE TO the ongoing COVID-19 public health emergency, a team of researchers developed an interactive web-based dashboard (static snapshot shown above) hosted by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University, to visualize and track reported cases in real-time.

To access the interactive map, click HERE.


 

Chicago-area medical resources

Illinois Department of Public Health – COVID

For information and updates on the COVID-19 situation from the Illinois Department of Public Health, click HERE.

The mission of the Illinois Department of Public Health is to protect the health and wellness of the people of Illinois through the prevention, health promotion, regulation, and the control of disease and injury.


City of Chicago Coronavirus Response Center

For information and updates on the COVID-19 situation from the City of Chicago, click HERE.

How to determine if you need testing
  • Question 1: Are you having symptoms like fever, cough, or difficulty breathing?
        • If YES: Please answer Question #2.
        • If NO: Testing is not needed. If you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, stay home and monitor symptoms for 14 days.

    Question 2: Are your symptoms severe?

        • If YES: Call your doctor or 911.
        • If NO: Please answer Question #3.

    Question 3: Are you over 60? And/or do you have an underlying medical condition like diabetes, cancer or heart disease?

        • If YES: Contact your doctor to determine if testing is needed.
        • IF NO: Testing is not needed. Stay home for 7 days from symptom onset and 72 hours after fever is gone and symptoms improve (whichever is longer) to avoid getting anyone else sick.

    If you have any additional questions please email us at coronavirus@chicago.gov or call 312-746-4835.

Local Resources

Cook County Department of Public Health

For updates on the COVID-19 situation from the Cook County Department of Public Health, including information for Individuals & Families, information for Healthcare Providers, and information for Communities, click HERE.

Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) serves 2.5 million residents and 127 municipalities in suburban Cook County (excluding Evanston, Oak Park, Skokie and Stickney Township), which have their own state-certified health departments. (Chicago Department of Public Health serves the City of Chicago).


Chicago Health Action Network – COVID

For information and updates on the COVID-19 situation from the City of Chicago, click HERE.

The Chicago Health Alert Network (HAN) provides the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) with the capacity for quick, efficient, reliable, and secure web-based communication with CDPH staff, providers of medical care, laboratories, first responders and other local public health agencies. The HAN facilitates CDPH’s day-to-day activities, including outbreak detection, investigation, and emergency response.


LOCAL HOSPITALS

 

Northwestern Medicine – COVID-19 Overview

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University of Chicago Medicine – Coronavirus Information
  • How soon after exposure can a person test positive for COVID-19?
  • What should I do if I think I might have COVID-19 or am experiencing symptoms of an upper respiratory infection?
  • When should I call a doctor for help?
  • When should I be going to the hospital or an emergency room for COVID-19?
  • What precautions should I take before I go to a doctor or emergency room?
  • When and how are doctors testing for COVID-19?
  • What does it mean if I’m told to self-isolate or quarantine at home?
  • What are the most important actions I can take to keep myself and other healthy?

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Rush University – COVID-19 Information
Resources
COVID-19 FAQs

—> Information curated by Evan Randall


 

Your medical questions answered: Part 2

What are the myths of COVID-19?

THERE IS SO MUCH information being disseminated about the Coronavirus, some true and some… not much. How much do you know about this virus? Test yourself answering the questions below. For all answers click HERE.

  • COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates
  • Cold weather and snow CANNOT kill the new coronavirus.
  • Taking a hot bath does not prevent the new coronavirus disease
  • The new coronavirus CANNOT be transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Are hand dryers effective in killing the new coronavirus?
  • Can an ultraviolet disinfection lamp kill the new coronavirus?
  • How effective are thermal scanners in detecting people infected with the new coronavirus?
  • Can spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body kill the new coronavirus?
  • Do vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus?
  • Can regularly rinsing your nose with saline help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?
  • Can eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?
  • Does the new coronavirus affect older people, or are younger people also susceptible?
  • Are antibiotics effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus?
  • Are there any specific medicines to prevent or treat the new coronavirus?

Why is COVID-19 testing being denied to some individuals?

THE CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians.

Priorities for Laboratory Testing for COVID-19

The CDC lists 3 priority levels for testing:

PRIORITY 1. Ensure optimal care options for all hospitalized patients, lessen the risk of nosocomial (originating in a hospital) infections, and maintain the integrity of the healthcare system

  • Hospitalized patients
  • Symptomatic healthcare workers

PRIORITY 2. Ensure that those who are at highest risk of complication of infection are rapidly identified and appropriately triaged

  • Patients in long-term care facilities with symptoms
  • Patients 65 years of age and older with symptoms
  • Patients with underlying conditions with symptoms
  • First responders with symptoms

PRIORITY 3 . As resources allow, test individuals in the surrounding community of rapidly increasing hospital cases to decrease community spread, and ensure health of essential workers

  • Critical infrastructure workers with symptoms
  • Individuals who do not meet any of the above categories with symptoms
  • Health care workers and first responders
  • Individuals with mild symptoms in communities experiencing high COVID-19 hospitalizations

Why hoarding Hydroxychloroquine needs to stop

THERE ARE SMALL, anecdotal studies that hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine—anti-malaria drugs— relieve the acute respiratory symptoms of covid-19 and clear the virus from infected patients. The Food and Drug Administration has given emergency approval to a Trump administration plan to distribute millions of doses of anti-malarial drugs to hospitals across the country, saying it is worth the risk of trying unproven treatments to slow the progression of the disease.

This has caused that hoarders are buying these drugs. This may include doctors and dentists—who are writing prescriptions for themselves or family members. For the complete Kaiser News Health story click HERE.


—> Information curated by Dr. Edel Marie Jose


 

Your medical questions answered: Part 1

What is Coronavirus?

CORONAVIRUSES (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.

Watch this short video to find out more.


How Coronavirus spreads?

AS A NEW DISEASE we are still learning how COVID-19 spreads, the severity of illness it causes, and to what extent it may spread in the United States. To learn what we know now, click HERE.


The name

OFFICIAL NAMES HAVE been announced for the virus responsible for COVID-19 (previously known as “2019 novel coronavirus”) and the disease it causes.  The official names are:

Disease Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

Virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2
(SARS-CoV-2)

To learn more about the virus naming, click HERE.


How long can Coronavirus live on surfaces?

  • In the air: 3 hrs
  • Copper: 4 hrs
  • Cardboard 24 hrs
  • Plastic 2-3 days
  • Stainless Steel 2-3 days

Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 as compared with SARS-CoV-1. Read more about surfaces HERE.


What are the symptoms of Coronavirus?

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Flu and cold symptoms
  • Unusual symptoms: Loss of smell, conjunctivitis, digestive problems

For more comprehensive details, click HERE.


What is Pneumoniae?

IT IS A LUNG INFLAMMATION caused by bacterial or viral infection, in which the air sacs fill with pus and may become solid. Inflammation may affect both lungs (double pneumonia), one lung (single pneumonia), or only certain lobes (lobar pneumonia). For a short video explaining more, click HERE.


What to do if you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it?

Department of Health and Human Services: If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it, follow these steps. Click HERE.

State Health Departments: What to do if you are concerned you have COVID-19. For information on each US state, click HERE.

Illinois
  • Stay home if you are sick and call your health care provider if you have coronavirus symptoms to discuss whether you should be evaluated in person and considered for testing.
  • Providers determine whether to conduct testing based on the Illinois Department of Public Health’s criteria, which evaluates a combination of symptoms and risk factors.
  • To help relieve symptoms: stay home and rest, take pain and fever medications and drink plenty of liquids. Seek medical attention if symptoms worsen.
  • After a provider sends samples to the public health lab, results should be available approximately 24 hours later.
  • Commercial labs are also conducting tests, which are then sent to the Illinois Department of Public Health’s laboratory for confirmation.
  • General questions about COVID-19 and Illinois’ response can be answered over the phone at 1-800-889-3931 or via email at DPH.SICK@ILLINOIS.GOV. More information is available on the Illinois Department of Public Health’s coronavirus website.

“Step by Step guide” to self-isolation

IF YOU ARE NOT sick enough to be hospitalized but are showing symptoms of coronavirus, you need to self-isolate to keep others in your home and your family safe. For a short video, click HERE.

 


are the young susceptible to COVID-19?

A RECENT ANALYSIS of COVID-19 cases in the United States reveals that while older people are at high risk of becoming seriously ill, the disease can hit younger adults hard, too. It shows that 1 in 5 people landing in the hospital are 20 to 44 years old.

The CDC analysis, released March 18, 2020, covers 2,449 reported cases from February 12 to March 16. Among 508 patients who required hospitalization, 20 percent were 20 to 44 years old. And of 121 people who were admitted to an intensive care unit, 12 percent were in that age group. For the complete ScienceNews story, click HERE.


—> Information curated by Dr. Edel Marie Jose