Book launch on Chile, 40 years after the coup, by Fulbrighter Kelly-Lowenstein

Ana Gonzalez, a feisty 87-year-old with bright red fingernails, survived many detentions and the disappearances of her husband, two of her sons, and a pregnant daughter-in-law during Gen. Augusto Pinochet’s regime. Her home in Santiago is filled with images of her family and important personalities in the struggle for justice in Chile and the world. A tireless fighter for human rights during the dictatorship, she pays tribute to her murdered relatives by continuing to wage a joyful struggle for justice and against oblivion: “When you take this path of liberation…, you know that you can die at any moment. But those of us who remain are not going to allow that to happen because forgetting is death. Because of that, memory is essential.” Forty years after the coup, Chile remains a wounded, divided nation where the past lives in the present. The nation’s enduring rifts are visible in the glaring contrast between the entrenched poverty in Santiago’s shantytowns and the country’s elite, who enriched themselves during the dictatorship. History is also a force in the November presidential election featuring Michelle Bachelet and Evelyn Matthei. The daughters of Air Force Generals played together as children, but their lives were changed permanently by the coup. Matthei’s father Fernando joined the junta. Bachelet’s father Alberto remained loyal to Salvador Allende and the constitution, paying for that decision with his life. Yet there are also glimmerings of Chile’s coming to terms with its bloody past. Among the most important: this September 11 saw an unprecedented outpouring of memory-related activity.

Ana González, then a feisty 87-year-old with bright red fingernails, survived many detentions and the disappearances of her husband, two of her sons, and a pregnant daughter-in-law during Gen. Augusto Pinochet’s regime. Photo by Jon Lowenstein

THE CHICAGO CHAPTER of the Fulbright Association, in partnership with  Public Narrative and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, would like to invite you to an evening of dialogue about Chile, and where the country stands 40 years after the Pinochet coup, with author, researcher and Fulbrighter, Jeff Kelly-Lowenstein (South Africa ’95, Chile ’13, New Zealand ’15).

chilean_chroniclesKelly-Lowenstein currently teaches journalism at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He will discuss his recently published book, The Chilean Chronicles.  The work is a compilation of writing during Jeff’s 2013 semester at the University Diego Portales in Santiago, Chile. The book reflects on the impact of the Pinochet regime on Chilean society, from a historical perspective, and on the country’s still-emerging democracy through recounting stories that would otherwise go untold.

WHERE  Columbia College Chicago, 33 E. Congress Parkway, Suite 610H

WHEN   Wednesday, November 30, 2016

TIME   6pm-8pm

COST   Free

RSVP Here!

Refreshments will be served.

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