Tag Archives: Elio Leturia

Education resources for students, instructors

IN THIS UNPRECEDENTED time, educational institutions and government agencies at all levels are providing different types of assistance and resources to help students and their families to navigate the “stay at home” order without jeopardizing their formal education development. Below you will find a list of formal and non-formal resources for you to consider.

Many educational institutions in the U.S. and worldwide have moved to online instruction, extended their spring break, shortened or adjusted their academic year, or have otherwise departed from the normal course of business, including the cancellation of graduation ceremonies. These institutions worldwide are striving to meet their students’ educational needs while working to reduce and decelerate the spread of the pandemic.

::: U.S. Department of Homeland Security (Student and Exchange Visitor Program). For the most updated information, click HERE and scroll down.

::: U.S. Department of Education. For the most updated information, click HERE and scroll down.

  • COVID-19 (“Coronavirus”) Information and Resources for Schools and School Personnel (both K-12 and Higher Education): See guidance here.
  • Guidance for Interruptions of Study Related to Coronavirus (COVID-19): See guidance here.
  • Dear CPA Letter CPA-20-01, Site Visit Exemption During COVID-19 Outbreak: See guidance here.
  • Information for Accrediting Agencies Regarding Temporary Flexibilities Provided to Coronavirus Impacted Institutions or Accrediting Agencies: See guidance here.
  • Coronavirus and Forbearance Info for Students, Borrowers, and Parents: See guidance here.

FOR STUDENTS

::: College Student Travel Assistance, Enterprise. Special accommodations from Enterprise for college students to get home, by lowering the minimum rental age and eliminating fees for young renters. For more information, click HERE.

::: Free Storage for College Students, U-Haul. U-haul is offering free storage for college students impacted by coronavirus. For more information, click HERE.

::: Federal Student Aid Forbearance. According to the US Department of Education, “to provide relief to student loan borrowers during the COVID-19 national emergency, federal student loan borrowers are automatically being placed in an administrative forbearance, which allows you to temporarily stop making your monthly loan payment. This suspension of payments will last until Sept. 30, 2020, but you can still make payments if you choose.” For more information, click HERE.

::: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE,) issued guidance on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Potential Procedural Adaptations for F and M Non-immigrant Students. To read the memo, click HERE.


FOR EDUCATORS

::: Resources for colleges and universities. To access a database of resources and information for colleges and universities in response to COVID-19, click HERE.

::: Hope Center guide. To download a guide for supporting students during COVID-19 from the Hope Center, click HERE.

::: Teacher2Teacher. This organization is a growing community where instructors can connect to share resources, learn from one another, and collaborate, especially now. For resources and reflections, click HERE.

::: The Office of Postsecondary Education, issued a COVID-19 FAQ and Guidance for interruptions of Study related to Coronavirus. To read the memo, click HERE.

::: The Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued Interim Guidance for Administrators of US Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) to Plan, Prepare, and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in English and Spanish. For more information, click HERE.

::: The Office of Postsecondary Education, issued Information for Accrediting Agencies Regarding Temporary Flexibilities Provided to Coronavirus Impacted Institutions or Accrediting Agencies. To read the memo from the Department of Education, click HERE.


At Home Non-Formal Education Activities

::: Department of Defense. To learn through videos about careers in STEM fields, click HERE.

::: Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. The NCES Kids’ Zone provides information to help learn about schools; decide on a college; engage in several games, quizzes and skill building about math, probability, graphing, and mathematicians; and to learn many interesting facts about education. To access the Kids’ Zone, click HERE.

::: Department of Energy

» For games and activities for children, click HERE.
» For games and activities for kids of all ages, click HERE.

:::  Environmental Protection Agency. For games, quizzes, and videos about the environment, click HERE.

::: The Library of Congress. For presentations and activities to help students learn about history, click HERE.

::: NASA

» For interactive lessons about space, Earth, solar system and universe, click HERE.
» For STEM-related activities for students of all ages, click HERE.

::: The Kennedy Center

» For Lunch Doodles with Mo Willems, click HERE.
» For a Tour the Kennedy Center with The Pigeon, click HERE.

::: The Smithsonian

» For free Smithsonian STEM Games and Simulations, click HERE.
» To Meet the Animals of the National Zoo, click HERE.
» For 3D Exhibits and Virtual Tours of museums and collections, click HERE.
» For the Museum of Natural History Virtual Tour, click HERE.
» For the Digital Smithsonian American Art Museum, click HERE.
» For Distance Learning Resources, click HERE.

::: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For students to use real-time ocean data to explore today’s most pressing environmental issues, click HERE.

::: US Geological Survey. To learn from home about Physical science, Geography and Maps, click HERE.


—> Illustration by Elio Leturia

Housing resources. Remain connected!

DURING THIS TIME of the “stay at home” mandate, there is nothing more important than having a roof over your head. Here are a few resources to help you in this time of crisis, and ways to stay in touch with your community.

STAY CONNECTED

Even though we need to practice social distancing restraining our physical contact, we can still be connected through other means, and get support.

Nextdoor is the neighborhood hub for trusted connections and the exchange of helpful information, goods, and services. This app is very useful for giving and receiving local tips and help in the area you live. Click HERE.

City of Chicago 311. With the new CHI 311 website and mobile app, you can create new service requests; check the status of existing requests and the time it will take to resolve; snap a photo and submit it with a request to improve accuracy; map requests to help pinpoint a location; create an account to track service requests and get local, relevant information; provide feedback upon completion; and search and see helpful knowledge articles and search other requests in your neighborhood.

Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. This website offers information on services ranging from rental assistance, emergency shelters, services for Senior Citizens, assistance with SNAP & TANF eligibility completion and many more. To access the website, click HERE.

City of Chicago Emergency Rental Assistance. This program provides financial assistance to Chicago residents to eligible individuals and families who are in danger of eviction in order to stabilize individuals and families in their existing rental unit. To access the website. click HERE.

Illinois Legal Aid Online. This organization offers guidance to resources to help you with your legal problem, including FIGHTING EVICTION (Note: Evictions in Chicago are banned for 30 days.) It provides court forms, legal information, and referrals to free or low-cost legal aid lawyers. To apply online, click HERE.

Howard Brown. This organization is offering services and information for LGBTQ youth who might be experiencing homelessness or need assistance. They can be contacted online, or for medical questions call our Patient Services Team at 773.388.1600. For more information, click HERE.

StreetLight Chicago. This organization provides up-to-date information on Chicago-based food, housing, and health resources for young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 with unstable housing. To connect with an interactive map with book-a-bed reservations click HERE.


FREE SUPPORT & MORATORIA

Comcast offers free internet. Low-income families who live in a Comcast service area can sign up as new customers to receive 60 days of free Internet Essentials service. To qualify for Comcast’s Internet Essentials service, customers must be eligible for public-assistance programs such as the National School Lunch Program, Housing Assistance, Medicaid, SNAP, or SSI. Applicants can visit internetessentials.com to enroll in the program; they may also call (855) 846-8376 for English or 855-765-6995 for Spanish. To read more about this, click HERE.

Charter offers free internet. Cable giant Charter Communications will provide free broadband for two months to households with students, as a number of U.S. schools are shutting down because of concerns about the coronavirus pandemic. To enroll in Charter’s free-broadband program, eligible consumers must call (844) 488-8395. To read more about this, click HERE.

ComEd moratorium. The electricity company has voluntarily implemented a moratorium on service disconnections for non-payment, effective immediately through May 1st. For more information, click HERE.

People’s Gas moratorium. According to the gas company website, “We are not disconnecting customer’s service for non-payment at this time.” For more information, click HERE.


—> Illustration by Elio Leturia


 

Food resources in Chicago

IN TIMES OF NEED, there is always somewhere to turn. With a record number of people filing for unemployment and rent due, many people are struggling to pay their bills and buy groceries. Here are some ways to stock up if your kitchen is bare and you’re not sure what to do.


FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

Students, if you are experiencing food insecurity, please look for a pop-up pantry at your university.

Food Security Resources at University of Chicago

Pop-Up Pantry | Wellness Center | University of Illinois at Chicago

Student Food Pantry at DePaul University


FOR EVERYBODY, INCLUDING CPS STUDENTS

Greater Chicago Food Depository. It’s Chicago’s food bank that provides food for hungry people while striving to end hunger in our community. They have a map application. Enter an address, intersection, or ZIP code to find a food pantry, soup kitchen, mobile food distribution or shelter in Cook County. For the most precise results, use the full address. Use the filters to select specific kinds of programs. To access the map and locations, click HERE.

Chicago Public Schools. Since the temporary closure of the schools due to COVID-19, Chicago Public Schools (CPS) has provided millions of grab-and-go meals to families. They are committed to providing meals during spring break and until CPS schools reopen. To find a CPS Go-and-Grab Meal Site click HERE.

Feeding America. The Feeding America nationwide network of food banks secures and distributes 4.3 billion meals each year through 200 food pantries and meal programs throughout the United States. To find a food pantry close to your home, click HERE.

StreetLight Chicago. This organization provides up-to-date information on Chicago-based food, housing, and health resources for young adults between the ages of 16 and 24. To connect with an interactive map with food resources click HERE.


SHOPPING HOURS FOR VULNERABLE POPULATION

Whether you shop at Aldi, Jewel, Mariano’s or Trader Joe’s, they have established shopping hours for senior citizens and other vulnerable populations. To find out about each individual store special schedule, click HERE.

Get help by phone from Greater Chicago Food Depository staff with determining eligibility and applying for Medicaid or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits.


FOR PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

In Chicago, public transit remains an essential service. To get information from the CTA about public transportation scheduling, frequency and alerts, click HERE.


—> Information curated by Dr. Edel Marie Jose and Suzanne McBride
—> Illustration by Elio Leturia
Icons by Eucalyp and Nikita Golubev/ flaticon.com


 

In times of distress, supporting local news sources is more important than ever

By Suzanne McBrideTHE HUNGER WE HAVE for news and information at this chaotic and confusing time demonstrates the important role the media plays in helping us navigate our ever-changing world. Now more than ever it’s imperative that each of us look for reliable information that has been confirmed by credible and authoritative sources we trust.

Where did your family member get the information he posted on Facebook? How did your friend get the information she posted on Twitter? Did the that information come from trained journalists reporting on the coronavirus? Or was your relative or friend simply sharing something they heard somewhere?


The “free” information that many of us get when we go online each day is not actually free.

This is the time when the importance of journalism, especially at the local level, is clear, and that’s why I’m asking each of you to make a commitment to support one local media outlet that’s helping you stay informed in this critical time. Whether it’s one of Chicago’s daily newspapers, a radio or television station, or an online site that covers your community, each of these outlets depends on your business to keep going and be able to provide the invaluable information you’ve come to rely on.

Well before the coronavirus crisis hit, hundreds of local newspapers over the last decade had closed, and many more now are in jeopardy. The “free” information that many of us get when we go online each day is not actually free. Journalists have to shift through a great deal of information; interview reluctant or fearful sources; confirm facts that are often complicated and convoluted; verify the veracity of video and photos submitted to them; produce coherent stories on deadline – and then do it all again later sometimes that same day.

At most media organizations, advertising, subscriptions and/or memberships used to cover the costs of reporters, photographers, editors and other journalists, but that’s not the case anymore at many places. Throughout the United States, news outlets have laid off employees, slashed their workers’ pay, furloughed staff members or had to shut down altogether. Your help is needed to prevent that from happening here in Chicago. Your support of even a few dollars a week can make all the difference.

Here are some of the many local news organizations I hope you’ll consider subscribing to or becoming a member. Please know this is not an exhaustive list:

» Block Club Chicago
» Chicago Defender
» Chicago Public Radio/WBEZ
» Chicago Public Television/WTTW
» Chicago Reader
» Chicago Reporter
» Chicago Sun-Times
» Chicago Tribune
» South Side Weekly

In a time of so much uncertainty when many of our budgets are already strained, I appreciate your willingness to support media institutions that help keep us informed about our democracy. Thank you!


Suzanne McBride is Chair of the Communication Department at Columbia College Chicago and an editor at the Chicago Sun-Times. She is also editor and publisher of AustinTalks.org, an online news site that covers Chicago’s West Side. She had her Fulbright in Ireland.

“Trapped” at home? Activities to enjoy our “free” time

By Dr. Tatiana Orlova—THE RECENT STAY-AT-HOME order has brought many changes into our lives. It is very important to be able to do what we enjoy during stressful situations, however, social distancing could make many activities very difficult or even impossible. We should view these new challenges as great opportunities to expand our interests and creativity.

These are some ideas for various activities suitable for our new “stay-at-home” lifestyles. We can learn new skills, enjoy music, exercise, check out that book we have been wanting to read but haven’t had the chance… My hope is that all of us will discover new ways to become happier while staying at home.

Learning

Music

Fitness

Reading
  • For great books about pandemic and solitude see this reading list from TIME magazine 
  • If you find yourself anxiously waiting for the current situation to resolve then reading great books about the fundamentals of time and reality could help put everything in the right perspective.
  • Also, find inspiration by searching and reading biographies of people who’s lives and careers were interrupted by war or other disasters, and learning how they were able to make the most out of their unfortunate circumstances. For example, Pal Turan and Marie Curie.

Art

Dr. Tatiana Orlova grew up in Saratov, Russia. Her Fulbright fellowship allowed her to pursue a MS in Mathematics at the University of South Carolina at Columbia. She later obtained a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Chicago and now works as a Chief Data Scientist at Amper Technologies. She feels honored to be a part of the Fulbright community.

—> Information curated by Dr. Tatiana Orlova
—> Illustration by Elio Leturia


 

Antropoloops, music and data visualization: Open musical collages by Rubén Alonso

 

—By Elio Leturia MUSIC AND VISUALS! Join the Columbia College Chicago Music, Communication, and Design Departments, in collaboration with the Instituto Cervantes and the Chicago Chapter of the Fulbright Association for a special live interactive music remix and data visualization show/talk with award-winning Spanish artist/architect Rubén Alonso.

The screening will be followed by a Q & A with Rubén Alonso, Associate Professor, School of Architecture, University of Málaga, Spain.

DATE Monday March 9, 2020
TIME 6:30pm – 8:00pm
LOCATION Hokin Lecture Hall, Columbia College Chicago, 623 S. Wabash Ave., first floor, Room 109, Chicago, IL 60605
Please R.S.V.P. clicking HERE.
COST FREE


About the project

Antropoloops is an audiovisual global artistic project that remixes musical pieces from fragments of traditional music from around the world while showing graphically where they come from; all done with the utmost respect to the original sources highlighting their value.

The two basic principles of the project are not modifying the original pitch of the music they use, and visualizing and opening up the remixing process. Since its origin in 2012, the project has been developing a creative approach to ethnomusicology, which has gradually opened towards its educational and historic possibilities, generating new synergies with other artists.


About the artist Rubén Alonso, Barcelona 1973

While studying architecture in Berlin in the late 1990s, Rubén fantasized about the romantic notion of the traveling ethnomusicologist who collects songs around the world, but the journey would begin years later, through the distributed archive of the web and from the music remix culture with the artistic project Antropoloops that he has been developing with Esperanza Moreno since 2012.

Architect Rubén Alonso teaches architecture at the University of Málaga, Spain.

With 4 albums published, the project has been presented in several festivals and spaces, both nationally and internationally (Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Slovenia, Chile, Argentina), as well as in several TEDx talks. The project has been developing a creative approach to ethnomusicology which has gradually opened towards its educational and historic possibilities, generating new synergies. He is also a member of the folk music group Las Buenas Noches.

As an Architect he is co-founder of the lapanaderia architecture studio (2003-2013) whose work has been recognized in national and international spheres and published in specialized press and magazines. He has co-directed research projects on housing as a process, adaptability in collective housing, low-cost public housing, and has been co-developer of the collective processes platform masqueunacasa.org. He has a PhD in Architecture from the University of Málaga and an Official Master in Social Sciences and Social Intervention from the University Pablo de Olavide in Seville. Since 2010 he is an associate professor at the School of Architecture in Málaga and also shares his centrifugal approach to architecture with Esperanza Moreno at estudiopack.

Spain at Columbia: Filmmaker Nayra Sanz Fuentes

JOIN THE COLUMBIA COLLEGE CHICAGO Cinema and Television Arts, and Communication Departments in collaboration with Instituto Cervantes and the Fulbright Association for a special screening of the short films “Sub Terrae”, “Un día cualquiera” (“Yet another day”) & “Selfie.”

The screening will be followed by a Q & A with award-winning film director Nayra Sanz Fuentes, Cinema and Television Arts Assistant Professor Carolina Posse, and Journalism Associate Professor Elio Leturia.

DATE Monday March 2, 2020
TIME 6:30pm – 9:00 pm
LOCATION Columbia College Chicago, 1104 S. Wabash Ave., third floor, Room 310, Chicago, IL 60605
Please R.S.V.P. clicking HERE.
COST FREE

About The Short Films

SUB TERRAE
Spain, 2017 | Runtime: 7 min
Director, Writer, Cinematography, Editing: Nayra Sanz Fuentes
Producer: José Luis Sanz de Garnica, Javier Sanz Fuentes
Language: without dialogues
Synopsis: Shadows are not always under the earth…


UN DÍA CUALQUIERA (“Yet Another Day”)
Spain, 2014 | Runtime: 29 min
Director, Writer, Editing: Nayra Sanz Fuentes
Cinematography: Carlos Vásquez
Producer: Víctor Moreno
Cast: Teresa Soria, Ricardo Reguera, Puchi Lagarde, Sara Martín, Diego Villena, Gala García Cuerva, Vicent Andrés
Language: Spanish with English subtitles
Synopsis: Another day in the life of Ana, but her boyfriend, family and friends don’t know her actual reality, even being part of it.


SELFIE
Spain, 2019 | Runtime: 9 min
Director, Writer, Cinematography, Editing: Nayra Sanz Fuentes
Producers: Nayra Sanz Fuentes, Javier Sanz Fuentes
Language: English with Spanish subtitles
Synopsis: This conceptual and sensory miniature rethinks the concept of the social (self) portrait by playing with the distortions of a Big Brother impassively watching over us. A technological state of permanent control, of mechanization of a daily life ruled by a human-made inventiveness that has ended up taking control of our lives.

Spanish filmmaker Nayra Sanz Fuentes

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR Nayra Sanz Fuentes, a Hispanic Philology major with specialization in contemporary literature, she did part of her doctoral thesis at Humboldt University in Berlin thanks to a grant from the DAAD, during which time she analyzed the National Socialist body through the work of Leni Riefenstahl. She then did a Master’s in Film Management in New York, where she began working on film productions.

Upon returning to Spain, she created the production company Rinoceronte Films, which focuses on film production and developing cultural projects. Her filmography features eight short films which have participated in more than 200 festivals (Anniversary, Encounter, Things in Common, Un día cualquiera, Sub Terrae, En esas tierras, Selfie and Drifts), and have won numerous awards. Her first feature film, Tan Antiguo como el Mundo, won the Precolombino de Oro Award at the Bogotá Film Festival. She was production director and editor on Edificio España, nominated to the Goya Awards, and co-producer and co-screenwriter on La ciudad oculta (The hidden city,) winner of the Feroz, the Spanish Cinema Critics Award.